Shit just got out of hand! “Italian” Mac-n-Cheese

from Daniel Larkin
to Jamey

I know I had mentioned to you about a week ago that I was planning on making some Southern Mac ‘n Cheese. Unfortunately (or fortunately, depending on who you ask) things got a little out of hand, and my simple comfort food spiraled into a whole different genre of dairy-and-pasta. Here’s how it all started.

I’ve made good Mac ‘n Cheese in the past, so good in fact that Jenny and my mother in-law both requested it for their birthday meals. Personally, I like my recipe, but I’ve never been a fan of fact that it’s kind of bullshit in that it’s just pasta, a roux with milk, and Velveeta. It tastes good. Obviously it should, Velveeta is engineered to hit every one of my fat-man sensors, but it’s too processed to warrant any real pride.

Well I recently found a squash “souffle” recipe that caught my eye, and its gooey consistency was perfect for what I wanted. So that’s where this all began. I say “began” because things really did get out of hand; I ran out of things, let time lapse on a few occasions, and ended up generally winging it.

Now before I lay this all out, I want to express my disgust for food companies that think adding a tiny bit of olive oil and a smidgen of shitty parmesan cheese to an already substandard product makes it “Italian” and therefore “gourmet.” Bullshit!  Italian food starts from the beginning concept, and is always about freshness! That’s why I refuse to call this Italian Mac ‘n Cheese.  This was all a happy accident that ended up using a few “Italian” components. But it’s kind of Italian Mac ‘n Cheese.

Here’s the ingredient list:

  •     12 Ounces whole wheat pasta spirals – cooked al dente, cooled
  •     3/4 pint cherry tomatoes – halved
  •     Bunch fresh basil
  •     Extra virgin olive oil
  •     Good shaved parmesan
  •     Handful fresh parsley
  •     2 Eggs — separated

For the sauce:

  •     2 tbs Butter
  •     2 tbs All purpose flour
  •     8 oz. block of good cheddar – shredded
  •     One cup whole cottage cheese.  None of that low fat bullshit.
  •     1-1/2 cups whole milk
  •     1-1/2 tsp salt, pepper to taste
  •     3-4 cloves of garlic, chopped
  •     Red pepper flakes to taste. (Late thought.  I didn’t try it, but it would certainly work wonders)

Toss your sliced grape tomatoes and chopped garlic in olive oil and roast them in the oven at 400º for 10 to 15 minutes — until they become fragrant.

Now, make the darkest roux you can with the butter and flour.  (Melt the butter over low heat, add the flour, and cook on LOW stirring often, until you get the color of cardboard.  If it smells like burning cardboard, you went too hot and need to start again.)

Add the milk to the roux and stir while you continue to simmer.  This will turn into a velvety rich cream.

Adding the cheese will cause the sauce to cool a bit.  That’s fine, because we want it a bit cool before we add the egg yolks.  After you’ve added the cheese and egg yolks, take the egg whites and whip them until they’re nice and frothy.

The rest is simple.  Just toss everything together in an oven safe dish; pasta, cheese sauce, roasted tomatoes and garlic, parsley and egg whites.  Top it all off with a sparse, but noticeable layer of parmesan and cover it.  Place the covered dish in an oven that has been preheated to 350º and bake for 30 minutes.

NOW!  Like I said, some of my personal timing was off.  Like an idiot, I tried to work out while this was cooking, and I let it go for close to an hour.  While that made for good burnt cheese sides (yumm!) it also dried everything out a bit.  I rolled with the punches and tried to moisten it up with late addition of cold, clean olive oil, which really breathed a breath of freshness that elevated everything to the next level.

So serve, scoop out a good portion, top with some chopped fresh basil and a good drizzle of fresh olive oil.

There you go, dude.  It may sound like a bit much for Mac ‘n Cheese, but it turned out wonderful.  Jenny and her mother both said it was better than the Velveeta version.  And that’s something I can actually be proud of.

from Jamey W. Bennett
to me

YUM! I do not believe one can go too far with mac n cheese. I always tell people when raving about Stone Brewing Company to drop the $18 on their mac n cheese, because it’s worth every penny. Sounds like you have $18-grade mac n cheese!

As far as the roux and burnt cardboard…I think that’s where I went wrong on my mac n cheese back at Easter. I knew immediately what you meant when you said that.

Advertisements

(Pickled) Scotch Eggs

from: Jamey Bennett
to: Daniel Larkin

Hey Dude,

We’ve talked a bit about your pickled eggs and your enjoyment of sausage. Well, I’m going to tell you how to make awesome Scotch eggs, and it’s super easy. In fact, if I were a betting man, I’d bet that you already make some kick ass Scotch eggs for your hikes. (Actually, I pickled Scotch egg is, I guess, called a Manchester egg. Or at least that’s what Google seems to tell me.)

Here’s all you need:

  • Pickled eggs – For the batch in the picture, I had three pickled chicken eggs, and 10 pickled quail eggs. I had regular pickled eggs, fermented beet juice pickled eggs, sweet Sriracha pickled eggs, and buffalo pickled eggs. More on that another time…
  • 1 lb breakfast sausage – Tube sausage, or get fresh stuff from Whole Foods or somewhere and squeeze them out of the casings. I like sage in my breakfast sausage.
  • 2 fresh eggs
  • 1 tbs Worchestershire sauce
  • 3/4 cup bread crumbs
  • Deep fryer, or a pretty deep layer of oil in a skillet to fry at least 1/2 an egg at a time

1. Simple. Here’s all you do. Carefully and evenly cover each of the eggs with sausage. Put them on a plate or a tray as you cover them, and stick them in the freezer for about 15 minutes.

2. Crack the eggs into a bowl and add the Worchestershire sauce and whip up until it’s all mixed in. Have the bread crumbs in a separate bowl.

3. Take out the eggs, and one at a time, dip them in the egg/sauce mixture and then the bread crumbs. Throw them in the deep fryer at 365 for about 5-7 minutes, until the Scotch eggs are browned all over.

Let cool about 10 minutes before serving. Serve whole or sliced in half (the long way) with spicy brown mustard, hot sauce, or just by itself. Great the next day hot or cold, and perfect to take on a hike for an afternoon snack on the first day.

from Daniel Larkin
to jamey w. bennett

Some friends of our have done “Bar Food Night” a few times, and this seems like a natural fit.  Fried meat-wrapped meat.  Perfect!  And I finally get to knock Scotch Eggs off my bucket list!

from: Jamey Bennett
to: Daniel Larkin

Of course, you don’t have to pickle the eggs first. Any hardboiled egg will do. I just like the flavor the pickled eggs add to the mix.

I thought of you when I was googling the history of Scotch eggs. Like many things related to food, nobody knows for sure. But the story I liked best said that Scottish shepherds invented them so that they could go out into the field for an entire day, and all they’d have to take is a sack with a little loaf of bread and a couple of Scotch eggs. The eggs were a big boost of protein, but not messy and something that wouldn’t spoil in a few hours. And of course, they’d be lighter on the way out…