Korean Shrimp Tacos

Hey Dude,
I made some fantastic Korean tacos tonight for friends visiting from California, and the flavor balance was perfect.

About 1 pound shrimp
2 tbsp soy sauce
1 tbsp rice wine
2 tbsp lemon juice
4 cloves minced garlic
Crushed red peper
A little ginger powder
A few grinds of fresh black pepper
A few shakes of Adobo seasoning

Combine all of these ingredients in a tupperware container, shake, and set aside to marinate.

photo

You will also need:
Cilantro, tortillas (preferably corn), red onion, Sriracha, pepper jack cheese, and prepared kimchi (easy to get at an Asian grocer, or make yourself).

Meanwhile, prepare any sides (I did spanish rice and refried beans with organic salsa), cook your tortillas, chop up a good deal of cilantro and fresh red onion (I guess you’d want to sautee these, but I like them raw), and chop up some of the kimchi so it’s not in such big pieces. Shred the cheese.

Cook the shrimp in a skillet, stirring and sifting from time to time. When most of the liquid cooks out, you should be done.

Combining the ingredients is simple: tortilla, shrimp, cheese, kimchi, onion, cilantro, and a single line of Sriracha. These are really good, simple, tacos. And my friend said she DOES NOT like kimchi, but she thought it was great in these tacos.

That’s it! I’ll send a photo over.

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Sauerkraut at Home

from Jamey W. Bennett
to Daniel Larkin

Dude,
So my sauerkraut was a hit at my wedding this past weekend, even among the non-kraut-enthusiasts. I used a combination of my priest’s “50 lbs. every autumn” recipe with some techniques I found online. Basically, I used an empty sanitized brew bucket, a growler filled with water (for weight), a small plate, a knife, a kitchen scale, a rolling pin (to smash the cabbage), about 20 lbs. of cabbage, and lots of salt.

Simply put: I’d slice the cabbage (getting rid of the core) into pretty thin strips. Using my kitchen scale, I’d slice and slice until I had 3-1/2 lbs. I’d throw that into the bucket with 1 tbs. non-iodized salt. I kept this up until I chopped it all up. Every now and then, I’d stir the mix and smash it together. My arms were pretty tired by the end. I had some serious juice-age in the bucket, too.

I put the plate on top of the cabbage and pushed down until all of the cabbage was submerged in the brine, and I set the growler on top of the plate to hold it down. I dropped the bucket off in my basement and covered it with a towel. I checked it every day for a little over two weeks, and skimmed any film off the top that developed. Next time I do it, I’m going to give it another week.

The caterer cooked it, and served it up with pieces of kielbasa. It was awesome.

How’d you do your kraut? I saw you linked this about it, but I was wondering how closely you followed it.

jamey

from Daniel Larkin
to Jamey W. Bennett

I followed that recipe to a T, and it turned out amazing!  I undershot my cabbage weight a little, though, so my spices were a bit more than they were supposed to be.  But that was fine, since the caraway seed, mustard seed, and juniper are all spices that go well with kraut-esque food anyway.

The only thing I’ll do differently is that when I periodically top off the cans to replenish evaporated water, I won’t used salt water.  I realized that the water may be evaporating, but the salt was being left behind, so I was really just salting the hell out of an already salty foodstuff.

But again, the recipe was bangin!  I have to make a bunch this week for our Oktoberfest party in a few weeks.